LAKE TITICACA

Fisherman, Lake Titicaca
Fisherman, Lake Titicaca

Lake Titicaca is the birthplace of the moon and the sun, and a white god-king called Viracocha. The Incas believed their civilisation rose from its magical waters; when the Spanish came in the 16th century, rumours abound how the Inca threw much of their treasure into the lake to protect it from the bearded marauders. Though you’re more likely to catch a trout than a golden lama, it doesn’t stop the sparkly-eyed treasure hunters donning their fins. A city the scale of Atlantis is also rumoured to be found within its depths. This is a mystical place,and as we arrive at Copacabana for the winter solstice New Age travellers, would-be druids and down-at-the-heel hippies seep from the shadows.

LA LUNE, LE SOLEIL ET LE PREMIER INCA SONT NES AU LAC TITICACA. LE SOLSTICE D’HIVER FAIT AFFLUER LES DRUIDES, ET AUTRES ILLUMINES SOUS AMPHETAMINES A COPACABANA, LA PETITE VILLE NICHEE EN CREUX AU BORD DU LAC.  ELLE N’A RIEN D’AUTRE A OFFRIR QUE BARS, RESTOS ET HOTELS POUR LES GRINGOS.  NOUS BIVOUAQUONS AU BORD DU LAC ET DECIDONS DE VISITER L’ILE DU SOLEIL APRES NOTRE BOUCLE EN BOLIVIE, DANS QUELQUES SEMAINES PUISQUE NOUS DEVRONS REPASSER PAR COPA POUR RETOURNER AU PEROU. LES DRUIDES SERONT PARTIS.

Copacabana, Lake Titicaca
Copacabana, Lake Titicaca

We spend the night parked on the lakeside. There are two other Swiss-registered vehicles here. The Swiss are about the only other travellers we meet – is anybody left in Switzerland, we wonder. Copacabana is a laid-back town catering for trekkers, pilgrims and chilled out tourists. We meet a shoe-shine boy from Nasca, but in a town of walking boots and sandals he’s on a hiding to nothing. We give him some money towards the bus ticket back to Nasca. We take a tourist boat out to the Uros Islands and spend the morning with the people who live on these tiny islands.

JAMES A MELANGE L’ORDRE CHRONOLOGIQUE.  AVANT COPACABANA (BOLIVIE), NOUS AVONS PASSE QUELQUES JOURS A PUNO (PEROU), TOUJOURS AU BORD DU LAC, POUR VISITER LES ILES UROS, CES ILES FAITES DE ROSEAUX, AVEC DES MAISONS EN ROSEAUX.  LES INDIENS UROS ONT TOUT D’ABORD CONSTRUITS DES “CATAMARANS” AVEC HABITATIONS POUR ECHAPPER AUX INCAS ET AUX CONQUISTADORS.  ILS SE SONT ENSUITE CONSTRUITS ET ANCRES DES ILES LOIN AU FOND DU LAC. UN CERTAIN PRESIDENT FUJIMORI LEUR A PROPOSE DE DEPLACER LEURS ILES PLUS PRES DE PUNO POUR EN FAIRE UNE DESTINATION TOURISTIQUE PLUS ACCESSIBLE….CERTAINS L’ONT FAIT. ILS SONT ENVIRON 2000 A VIVRE D’UN TOURISME COMMUNAUTAIRE PLUTOT BIEN ORGANISE.  IL FAUT DIRE QUE C’EST PLUS FACILE QUE DE VIVRE DE PECHE ET DE CHASSE.

Uros Islands, Lake Titicaca
Uros Islands, Lake Titicaca
Uros Island ladies, Lake Titicaca
Uros Island ladies, Lake Titicaca
Uros Islands, Lake Titicaca
Uros Islands, Lake Titicaca

From Copacabana we must cross the choppy Tiquina Straits on a rickety raft with a small outboard motor fixed to the back. By the time we reach the middle of the straits the flexible dynamics of these rafts becomes all to evident to us twitchy sailors. Its timber frame creaks and groans as we corkscrew through the troughs. The bus we’ve been teamed up with has no parking brake and hurriedly we jam lumps of timber under its wheels to stop it (and us) rolling off the end. We are very pleased to reach the other side.

DE COPACABANA, IL FAUT TRAVERSER LE PETIT  DETROIT DE TIQUINA EN RADEAU MOTORISE, QUE TOUT BAROUDEUR APPREHENDE. UNE AFFAIRE DE 20 MINUTES. LE PETIT MOTEUR HORS-BORD A BIEN DU MAL A NOUS FAIRE TRAVERSER, LE VENT SOUFFLE FORT DANS LA MAUVAISE DIRECTION EVIDEMMENT.  NOUS PARTAGEONS NOTRE EMBARCATION POURRIE AVEC UN BUS QUI TANGUE VIOLEMMENT ET QUI A L’EVIDENCE N’A PAS DE FREIN A MAIN.  NOUS NOUS JETONS SOUS LA BETE POUR METTRE DES CALES SOUS LES PNEUS ET L’EMPECHER D’ENVOYER LA ROULOTTE AU FOND DU LAC. JE DEMANDE AU BATELIER POURQUOI IL N’Y A PAS DE PONT.  SANS BLAGUE, IL Y A DU TRAFFIC….ET LA TRAVERSEE EST COURTE.  LES LOCAUX NE VEULENT PAS DE PONT, IL N’Y AURAIT PLUS DE TRAVAIL POUR LES RADEAUX. IL Y A EU QUELQUES NAUFFRAGES POURTANT.

Crossing the Tiquina Strait, Lake Titicaca
Crossing the Tiquina Strait, Lake Titicaca

Back on Terra Firma we head east to the hill village of Sorata, supposedly the heart of Bolivia’s trekking country. In colonial days Sorata was the link to the Alto Beni’s goldfields and rubber plantations and a gateway to the amazon basin. It rests at 2,500 metres, something of a relief after a week at 3,800. The guidebook says there was a riot here in 2003, after the army broke up a demonstration, mowing down a campesino in the process. Apparently tourism has never really recovered – no kidding! There are only mud roads and just getting through the village is like doing the Camel Trophy. Once you get used to the visual aspect of Sorata then it really is a nice place, and the people very friendly. Being out in the sticks they have to improvise here: we pass a man washing his clothes in a wheel-barrow, his undies hanging on the handles to dry. There is a Swiss man in Sorata, a master baker by trade, and he makes wonderful cakes and excellent bread. We had a natter with him in the garden of his cafe. He’s been here fourteen years and runs cooking courses for the local youths wishing to seek work in the bright lights of La Paz.

NOUS APPREHENDONS UN PEU LA CAPITALE BOLIVIENNE, ALORS NOUS FAISONS UN DETOUR DE QUELQUES JOURS PAR SORATA, A 150 KMS DE LA PAZ POUR REPOUSSER L’INEVITABLE.  ET PUIS C’EST PLUS BAS, PLUS VERT, PLUS CHAUD. ON RESPIRE ET ON MANGE LES GATAUX D’UN EXPATRIE SUISSE (ENCORE!) DE LONGUE DATE QUI HABITE LE VILLAGE ET FORME DES JEUNES  A LA BOULANGERIE ET A LA PATISSERIE. FORMATION FAITE ET VISEE PAR LE PATRON, CES JEUNES VONT TRAVAILLER A LA PAZ, SOIT CHEZ UN CONCURRENT, SOIT DANS SON CAFE. SORATA EST SOIT-DISANT LA CAPITAE DE LA RANDO EN HAUTE MONTAGNE DE LA BOLIVIE. LES MONTAGNES ENVIRONNANTES SONT CERTAINEMENT SPECTACULAIRES, LES GENS SYMPAS. NOUS FAISONS NOS EMPLETES AU MARCHE. NOUS NOUS PROMENONS. ZERO TOURISTES.

The cheese seller of Sorata
The cheese seller of Sorata
The shoe-shine boy of Sorata
The shoe-shine boy of Sorata
A fruit seller of Sorata
A fruit seller of Sorata
The butcher of Sorata
The butcher of Sorata
"It costs how much?"
“It costs how much?”
Street life, Sorata
Street life, Sorata

Despite claiming to be the trekking centre of Bolivia we didn’t see any tourists, so I took a picture of Christine as proof thst at least some foreigners do come here.

BON, LA J’AI L’AIR DE NE RIEN COMPRENDRE….CA M’ARRIVE PARFOIS.

A confused tourist
A confused tourist

EL CONDOR PASA

IMG_2618

After six days in Arequipa it was time to push on and gain some altitude. ‘Gently does it’ is not a term that applies here. It is recommended to ascend 1,000 metres every three days. Within a couple of hours of leaving Arequipa (2,300 metres) we are already pushing 4,900 metres. We manage to descend to 3,800 metres, breaking our journey to Lake Titicaca at the Colca Canyon, where we pass the next forty-eight hours in the company of condors. We move slowly and take short steps. When Edward E Fitzgerald climbed Aconcagua in 1897 he found that port wine with half a dozen eggs shaken in a bottle provided adequate nourishment. Antoine Carrel would take only warmed red wine with a little spice and sugar, which he assured was good for anything. We resort to cups of coca mate – though it might as well be an infusion of grass cuttings for the good it does.

NOUS PARTONS D’AREQUIPA POUR LE CANYON DE COLCA, APRES UN PASSAGE DE COL A 4900 M D’ALTITUDE DANS LA GRISAILLE ET LA NEIGE POUR ARRIVER DANS UNE VERTE VALLEE DE 100 KMS DE LONG, PARSEMEE DE VILLAGES AGRICOLES TRANQUILES ET OU UNE VINGTAINE DE CONDORS ONT ELU DOMICILE. NOUS PASSERONS 2 NUITS AU MIRADOR.  LES GOUPES DE TOURISTES AFFLUENT DE 8H A 10H DU MATIN, MAIS LES CONDORS VOLENT TOUTE LA JOURNEE SI LE FLUX D’AIR CHAUD LE LEUR PERMET ET NOUS SOMMES SEULS A LES OBSERVER.  ILS SONT SI GRACIEUX DANS LE CIEL BLEU QUE L’ON EN OUBLIE QU’ILS NE SONT QUE DE VULGAIRES VAUTOURS.

   

Sleet at the 4900 metre pass to Colca Canyon
Sleet at the 4900 metre pass to Colca Canyon

                                                                                                                        

For many years an argument raged as to whether the Colca Canyon is the world’s deepest canyon at 3,191 metres, but it ranks a close second to the Cotahuasi Canyon a short distance to the east. Both these canyons are twice as deep as the Grand Canyon in the USA. The generally sunny weather produces updrafts on which the condors soar.

LE CANYON A LONGTEMPS ETE CONSIDERE LE PLUS PROFOND DU MONDE POUR ETRE FINALEMENT DETRONE PAR LE CANYON DE COTAHUASI TOUT PRES A L’EST. PEU IMPORTE, IL EST QUAND MEME 2 FOIS PLUS PROFOND QUE LE GRAND CANYON USA. IMPRESSIONANT.

IMG_2644

The local people are descendants of the Cabanas and the Collagua. They used to distinguish themselves by performing cranial deformations. These days they find it easier to wear distinctly shaped hats.

LA VALLEE ET LES PENTES ABRUPTES SONT TOTALEMENT COUVERTES DE CULTURES EN PETITES  TERRASSES. QUEL COURAGE POUR FAIRE POUSSER SES QUELQUES PATATES. TOUT LE TRAVAIL SE FAIT MANUELLEMENT.  NOUS APPROCHONS DU SOLSTICE D’HIVER, LES CULTURES SONT RENTREES ET LES VACHES ET AUTRES MOUTONS DOIVENT NETTOYER LE SITE ET LAISSER LEUR ENGRAIS……LA POPULATION LOCALE EST ISSUE DE 2 ETHNIES, LES CABANAS ET LES COLLAGUA.  ILS SE DIFFERENTIAIENT EN DEFFORMANT LEUR CRANE. DE NOS JOURS, LES FEMMES PORTENT DES CHAPEAUX DISTINCTS. PAS DE PHOTOS, SOIT IL FAUT PAYER, SOIT C’EST NON TOUT COURT. ELLES DOIVENT SE SENTIR SOUS LES FLASHS DES PAPARAZZI, IL Y A TELLEMENT DE TOURISTES.  ELLES NE VEULENT QUE VENDRE LEUR ARTISANAT.

Chivay, Colca Canyon
Chivay, Colca Canyon
Example of pre-Columbian terracing
Example of pre-Columbian terracing

At Chivay there is the famous La Calera hot springs. An early morning soak in their steaming pool was most welcome after a chilly night. Revitalised we push on to Lake Titicaca.

L’AUTRE ATTRACTION DU CANYON SONT LES TERMES DE CHIVAY.  NOUS Y PASSONS NOTRE 3IEME NUIT POUR ETRE SEULS A FAIRE TREMPETTE DE BON MATIN DANS UN BAIN A 38 DEGRES…..PENDANT QUE LES TOURISTES OBSERVENT LES CONDORS.

P1050125

Ampato Volcano
Ampato Volcano

NOUS AVIONS RENCONTRE JUANITA DANS UN FABULEUX  MUSEE D’AREQUIPA QUI LUI EST DEDIE.  ELLE AVAIT ENVIRON 13 OU 14  ANS IL Y A 500 ANS ET ELLE A ETE DECOUVERTE PAR CHANCE AVEC 3 AUTRES MOMMIES CONGELEES AU SOMMET DU VOLCAN AMPATO A PLUS DE 6000 m  APRES MAINTES ANNEES DE RECHERCHES ARCHEOLOGIQUES DANS CETTE ZONE.  EN PARTANT DU CANYON DIRECTION PUNO ET LE LAC TITICACA, NOUS AVIONS UNE VUE IMPRENABLE SUR SON LIEU DE SACRIFICE. IL EST POSSIBLE D’ESCALADER LE VOLCAN MAIS NON MERCI……TITICACA NOUS APPELLE.

IMG_2565   IMG_2665 IMG_2571

Alpaca
Alpaca

 

Images of Arequipa, Peru

P1050031

In South America there is a time during the day when city roads are best avoided. From eleven in the morning until two in the afternoon chaos rules. We arrived in Arequipa at 12.30 – wonderful! When even the traffic cops jump the red light for no apparent reason you know you’re in for a treat. Here they have these taxis produced by Daewoo – it is a small box on castors, and is quite lethal. If they had teeth they would take a chunk from your ankle. Road signs are not so good in Peru. I prefer a map to navigate with, though I had to resort to the Garmin 60, which only works in a straight line, so good for mariners and desert nomads. However, in cities laid out on a grid system, as this place is, it works pretty well. It took us directly to hostal Las Mercedes, where we billet for the garden for the next few days

Je reviens à mon dernier post. Tacna  n’est pas aussi terrible que je l’avais pensé. Je ne sais pas pourquoi le Chili l’a rendue au Pérou. Apparemment les habitants ont voté.

la route pour Arequipa continue dans le désert. Et notre arrivée en ville fut chaotique. Sans carte mais avec le GPS basique qui ne nous sert que rarement, nous avons réussi à manœuvrer une circulation folle principalement composée de petits taxis agressifs, et sommes arrivés à l´hotel Mercedes, parking herbeux, à 10minutes à pied du centre historique. parfait! C’est une maison coloniale, bleue, avec un beau jardin et des meubles de famille visiblement hérités de différentes époques.

P1050057 P1050060

This is a wonderful city, full of Spanish architecture dating back to the time of the conquistadores. Regular earthquakes do their best to destroy it (they say there is one a week) and the city just keeps reconstructing itself. The museums are fabulous. We are beginning to learn how the Inca’s have enjoyed some wonderful marketing over the years, for they stand head and shoulders above some of the other significant pre-Columbian Kingdoms. In the Santurario Andina Museum we meet ‘Juanita’ – in a manner of speaking. She is in a glass box, her head poking from a mound of ice. Juanita has been dead for more than five hundred years. She was a sacrifice offered by Inca priests to appease the gods. She was found at an altitude of 6300 metres on Ampato Volcano, not so far from Arequipe.

Il y a tout ce qu’on aime à Arequipa….un centre historique énorme et fabuleux: la place centrale est jolie et animée jour et nuit, la cathédrale fait tout une longueur de la place, en cela unique en Amérique du Sud.  Des bâtiments coloniaux superbement rénovés, la terre tremble très régulièrement et fait son possible pour détruire. Des musées variés et d’excellente qualité, des couvents, des églises. Et hors du centre, une grande ville qui palpite et vibre.

IMG_2507

IMG_2508

P1050020

P1040994

On Friday night we had a storm. A tree collapsed on our neighbours caravan and Misti volcano belched a heap of dust. A cross-eyed, wizened fellow of about 120 years arrived on Saturday morning to cut up the tree with a panga. I said to Christine that the man might be here for the rest of his life if he was going to cut up this tree with a panga. By lunchtime he’d finished the job – incredible! On Sunday night we went with our neighbours to a barrio called Recoleta to listen to some local bands playing music from Ayacucho. It was the type of place where your shoes stick to the floor and people carve their names on the tables. It was great music, a kind of combination of rock and folk music…including pan pipes. But it was not the pan pipes we used to push our trolleys round the supermarket to. This was actually pretty groovy stuff. By nine the place started to fill with drunks and fellows being whipped into a trance by whatever else they were on, so we decided to beat it back home.

Ce n’est pas la période des pluies mais nous en avons eu….un orage du diable vendredi. la caravane de notre voisin mexicain  à bien failli se faire ratatiner, un arbre du parking lui est tombé dessus. Donc le propriétaire a decidé de tout abattre. Sage solution pour ceux qui plantent la tente!  Bon, nous avions eu de la pluie à Tombouctou, nous ne nous étonnons plus de rien. L’un des 3 volcans qui entourent la ville à craché ses cendres.

Pour nous remettre de nos émotions, nous sommes allés tous les 4 dans un bar à musique traditionelle…le nom du bar est ” rompe y raja de Cotahuasi”…..en fait pop folk avec amplis et guitarres electriques. on y sert que de la bière et les musiciens défilent. Ils arrivent les uns après les autres, sortent leur instrument et se joignent à ce qui est entrain de se jouer, Apparemment les tubes d’Ayacucho……les gens chantent, dansent et boivent beaucoup.  Le dernier à  arriver a sorti ses flûtes de pan. Des grandes, des petites. Elles ont toutes un nom que j’ai oublié. Nous sommes partis quand l’atmosphère à commencé à dégénérer mais avons passé un bon moment.

P1050009            P1050003

IMG_2516

P1050052                         P1050012

P1050019

P1050053

For some reason we thought the choice of food in Peru would be poor. It is much better than Argentina and Chile. In Argentina, if you don’t like beef you’re stuffed. In Chile there are a handful of different vegetables – usually their terrible quality. Here the choice is fantastic. There is a fancy supermarket five minutes walk from us and the Central Market is an eye-opener for its range of fruit and veg. The meat looks a bit dodgy, though.

Autre visite favorite et toujours haute en couleurs et en senteurs, le marché central. On s´y restaure sans toujours savoir ce que l’on mange et on observe marchands et clients. James est heureux de voir autant de pommes de terres. Il m’en fait acheter 3sortes pour le repas du soir. Et bien lui en a pris…..elles sont delicieuses. Les péruviens aiment manger, c’est une bonne nouvelle après le régime argentin et chilien!

P1050063        P1050066

P1050067

CHILI -La Serena to Arica

After servicing the car and changing the tyres (which took a week) in La Serena we make our first night stop at Llanos de Challe National Park.

A la Serena, nous faisons la révision de la voiture, freins et pneus neufs pour affronter les dénivelés de la Bolivie. Premier bivouac au parc national LLLANOS de Challe. 

P1040938

Here we have already started our journey into the Atacama Desert. Some of the dunes are covered in the green shoots of flowers waiting to push through with the next rains. From here we join the Pan American Highway, making our next stop at the Pan Azucar park. In Taltal, a town formerly made prosperous by the nitrate boom of the early 20th century we find ourselves a fishmonger on the seafront.

Nous sommes dans le désert de l’Atacama. S’il pleut assez, les dunes fleuriront au printemps. Le garde est confiant. Puis nous reprenons la Panaméricaine et bivouacons au parc national de Azucar, visité l’an dernier.

 

IMG_2474

We arrive in Taltal just in time for the annual Pelican Beauty Parade, an event not to be missed.

Arret déjeuner à Taltal et nous y trouvons un pêcheur vendant ses prises de la matinée. Ce sera ragoût de poisson pour le dîner.

IMG_2480

From here we are back on the rugged coastal road until reaching Antofagasta, a crazy, bustling place that has mushroomed on the back of the copper boom. It’s late in the day but we manage to put ourselves between a newly built apartment block and a brick wall enclosing the golf course. At three in the morning I awake to a hissing sound. Thinking some clown is letting our tyres down I leap from bed to investigate, only to find it is the sprinklers on the gold course. Continuing along the coastal road, we are between the pacific rollers and a mountain rising up two thousand metres – no where to go if the much-talked-of tsunami occurs.

Antofagasta n´est pas la ville la plus attractive. Nous trouvons un parking en bordure du terrain de golf, avec vue mer. Cette ville est le centre névralgique de services et support technique aux nombreuses mines de la région. La mer est polluée, on ne se pose pas trop la question de la qualité du poisson…..nous continuons par la côté jusqu´à Iquique. La route est coincée entre les grosses vagues du pacific et la montagne nue.

Next stop Iquique.

P1040953

Many of the colonial buildings have been well preserved in Iquique (regular earthquakes really cause a problem) and some parts of the town are like walking on Hollywood set. The Chinchorro are thought to have been the first inhabitants along this stretch of coastline. When they blew up Esmerelda Hill they uncovered a heap of Chinchorro mummies. Apparently they loved making mummies of their dead – we’ve seen a lot.

Iquique est moderne et affluente. Nous y passons 3 jours et visitons le centre historique où il reste nombre de bâtiments coloniaux en bois et le musée régional….fier des ses mommies  de la tribu Chinchorro, trouvées par hasard . Il fallait faire sauter une d’une à l’explosif pour agrandir la ville, rien que ça, et qui voilà? Les mommies les plus anciennes du monde, 6000 ans et pour une fois sur la côte plutôt qu’à 5000m d’altitude.

 

P1040987

One of out bivouac sites already came with a bed.

Bivouac sur un site de géo glyphes pré-hispaniques. Et d´une ancienne mine de nitrates. Locomotive sur ses rails et un lit….

 

 

P1040967

Much of northern Chile suffered when the nitrate boom came to an end in the 60s and there are many a ghost town to explore.

Nous visitons le village fantôme et site Unesco de Humberstone, où les bâtiments sont restés en l´etat depuis les années 60, date de l’abandon de la mine de nitrate se soude. Tout y est…..école, théâtre, hôtel, maisons,outils, site de production. Drôle de vie en plein désert.

 

 

P1040958 P1040956

Finally we arrive in Arica (2000Km after leaving La Serena) just in time for outdoor Sunday mass.

Puis nous arrivons à notre dernière étape chilienne . Arica, le ville de l’eternel printemps disent-ils. ici il ne pleut jamais.  Nous arrivons à faire remplir nos bouteilles de gaz, il était temps, et paressons plusieurs jours. Visite de la ville, l´eglise et le bâtiment des douanes ont été construits par Gustave Eiffel. Une commande du président de l’époque après un tremblement de terre.

Dimanche, messe en plein air et début d’un mois de célébrations. Ça commence par un festival folklorique de Cuenca d´une semaine et  puis il faut bien célébrer la guerre du pacifique….le Chili a étendu son territoire en prenant au Pérou la région Arica-Tacna. Elle a finalement rendu Tacna au Pérou…….c’est que ça ne doit pas être terrible…..nous y serons demain, je vous dirai.

 

 

P1040980

And some pre-Columbian art.

IMG_2506  IMG_2492